Panoramica Panasonic Lumix GX850

Hands-on with the Panasonic Lumix GX850

Panasonic combines its ‘beauty’-oriented GF line of interchangeable lens cameras and the ultra-compact-oriented GM line with the introduction of the Lumix GX850 (GX800/GF9 in some markets). The GX850 has a lot in common with its most direct predecessor, the GF8, but one major improvement is the inclusion of 4K video capture (at 24/25/30p). It also gains all of Panasonic’s 4K-related stills modes as well as post focus.

On the surface the GX850 looks more like it belongs in the super-small GM series, sporting a rangefinder-style design, than the GF series, which leans toward an SLR-style design. And despite looking pretty similar to the GM5, the GX850 has no electronic viewfinder, bringing it more in-line with the GF7/GF8 and GM1. It effectively replaces both the GF8 and the GM5. 

Get a closer look at Panasonic’s newest, littlest ILC by clicking through the slides above.

Hands-on with the Panasonic Lumix GX850

The GX850 uses a familiar 16MP Four Thirds chip with no optical low-pass filter and Panasonic’s latest Venus engine. The burst rate is 5.8 fps with focus and exposure locked on the first shot and 5 fps with continuous AF/AE. Thats a 1 fps drop from the maximum burst rate (w/ AF-C) offered by its big brothers, the GX85 and G85, and the same burst rate offered by its predecessor.

The GX850 uses Contrast Detect AF and offers Panasonic’s excellent Depth from Defocus AF, which has impressed us with its abilities to maintain focus on moving subjects.

Hands-on with the Panasonic Lumix GX850

The GX850 features a 3-inch 1.04M-dot tilting monitor, which can be flipped up 180-degrees for selfies. It has the same ‘Beauty Retouch’ function found on the GF8, which clears up skin texture, whitens teeth and adds makeup after-the-fact. It also has a ‘slimming’ effect mode.

Additionally, the camera offers both ‘Buddy Shutter’ and ‘Face Shutter’ to make taking selfies easier. The former snaps a photo when the camera detect two face close to one another, the later fires the shutter when you wave your hands in front of your face. Additionally, users can now capture panoramas in Self Shot mode.

Hands-on with the Panasonic Lumix GX850

The top of the camera doesn’t offer a whole lot of control points, but then again, Panasonic’s intended consumer is ‘step-up’ users, so they may not mind. There is a dedicated 4K photo button (that can be re-programmed). The camera also offers a built-in pop-up flash which, sadly, cannot be tilted upwards. It has a guide number of 5.6m at ISO 200.

If you were hoping for a hotshoe like on the GM5, you’re out of luck. It’s worth noting that the flash is now located directly above the lens, which was not the case with the GM1 (though was the case for the GF7/GF8).

Hands-on with the Panasonic Lumix GX850

In case you can’t tell from the image above, the GX850 is very small. It is also incredibly light, weighing in at 9.5oz/269g. That’s actually a little heavier than the GM1 and GM5, and about the same weight as the GF7/GF8.

The back of the camera doesn’t offer users a whole lot in the way of physical control points, though most folks will likely control the majority of settings via the touchscreen. Fortunately, Panasonic offers one of the best touch implementations of any camera manufacturer.

Hands-on with the Panasonic Lumix GX850

The GX850 has both HDMI and USB ports, the latter of which is used for both transferring images and for charging the camera. It also has built-in Wi-Fi, which Panasonic touts as being incredible easy to set up and use in conjunction with one’s smart device. Our past experiences with Panasonic’s Wi-Fi implementation are largely positive.

Hands-on with the Panasonic Lumix GX850

The GX850 uses the same DMW-BLH7 battery as its predecessor and is rated at 210 shots per charge, which sounds pretty limited. A microSD slot also shares the same compartment as the battery. The GX850 is the company’s first mirrorless camera to use this minuscule card format.

Hands-on with the Panasonic Lumix GX850

Lastly, the camera gains Panasonic’s relatively new ‘L.Monochrome’ photo style, which is meant emulate ‘deep black and rich gradation like that of B/W film.’ We’re big fans of it, and users will likely appreciate its moody look. And of course, it wouldn’t be a Panasonic camera without the ‘Cute Dessert’ scene mode.

The GX850 will be available in the US in early February for a body-only price of $549 in the silver and black design (shown here).

Courtesy from Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)
Leggi l’articolo originale: http://ift.tt/2iEv9YN